Ways To Make Sure Your Time As A Tenant Goes Smoothly

Ways To Make Sure Your Time As A Tenant Goes Smoothly

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– Hi, this is attorney Marie Martin of Martin and Hedervare, PLLC, and today’s topic is ways to make sure your time as a tenant goes smoothly. First and foremost, you should be familiar with the terms of the
lease that you signed when moving into your rental home. Most common situations
should be spelled out in it. Everyone who is an occupant of the home should be listed on the lease. Most landlords put limits
on the amount of time someone who is not listed as an occupant on the lease can stay there. The lease also usually
says exactly what date the rent is due and when late fees will be added to the amount due. Minnesota state law limits
the amount of a late fee to 8% of the amount that is late. If you make your rent payments in cash, always get a receipt and keep that receipt in a permanent file with
other rental documents like the lease and the initial checklist of the condition of the
home when you moved in. Minnesota law also
limits the amount charged for a return check to $30. If you pay your rent by money order, fill out the receipt portion and keep it for your records as well. It may be difficult or impossible to get copies of the money orders from the issuer without
that receipt portion. Your landlord is responsible for making sure that your rental unit is fit to live in, kept
in reasonable repair, kept in compliance with
state and local health laws, and made reasonably energy
efficient while you live there. Your landlord cannot
waive these obligations under Minnesota state law. If your landlord won’t make repairs after you notify them in writing that a repair is needed,
you should request an inspection from the
city that you live in. In Minnesota there is no right of a tenant to make a repair and deduct the cost of the repair from rent. If you pay for the repair yourself, be prepared to pay the full
amount of rent as well. If you don’t or can’t
make the repair yourself and your landlord doesn’t
respond to the inspection, you might be able to go to court and get an order for
the repairs to be made. You must still pay the rent, but you pay it to the court, which holds the funds
in an escrow account. If you live in a large complex, you might not have to
make the rent deposit, but you will probably
need to hire an attorney to represent all the tenants because of the complexity involved in going to court in
this type of situation. Your landlord must respect
your right to privacy and may enter your unit only
under certain circumstances. There must be a reasonable
business purpose for the entry and they have
to make a good faith effort to give you reasonable notice
under the circumstances that they plan to enter your unit. Immediate entry is
reasonable if it’s necessary to prevent injury, to
check on your safety, or to check on unlawful activities. If you request emergency assistance, such as calling the police
to your rental property, your landlord cannot evict, penalize, or limit your right to
call for such services. If you have any questions or
comments, send us an email at [email protected]

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